Ads suck, but the RevenueHits service has an interesting model

Ads suck. We know that. The rise of Ad Blockers and companies moving towards an ad-free platform are on the rise, and it comes as no surprise. Consumers hate ads. Even commercials are annoying — annoying enough to encourage them to record the episodes and fast forward, or pay for a service like Netflix, and this is exactly the benefit of using ads as a service provider. While people hate ads, you are able to increase premium subscriptions and get them to buy into anything to remove the ads, given the ads aren’t too annoying they drive away traffic.

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Ads suck, but the RevenueHits service has an interesting model

Why Twitter Should Keep the 140 Character Limit

Recently, I’ve seen a lot of articles and headlines reading things like “For Twitter to survive, they need to abolish the character limit.” Now I haven’t been in the world of tech as long as these journalists have, and I’m no expert on the metrics of networks like Facebook versus Twitter in relation to their character limits, but I firmly believe they should keep the limit, and here’s why.

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Why Twitter Should Keep the 140 Character Limit

And that’s a wrap! – Mozilla, Summer 2015

It’s been two weeks since my summer ended with Mozilla, and I can’t say it’s been easy to take a break. I’ve spent so much time with the team, from attending the work week in Whistler, to chatting with them on IRC. I had a blast working with Dave Hunt on my project, and learned a lot more about test automation, QA, and web development.

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And that’s a wrap! – Mozilla, Summer 2015

Reflections on Mozilla’s Whistler Work Week

Last Friday marked the end of Mozilla’s 2015 mid-year work week and I have to say, it was one of the best one’s I’ve ever attended. I’ve only attended one other workweek (Portland, December 2014), but it’s been awesome. Before I go into the details, I want to applaud Mozilla on their exceptional effort to involve community in events like this. Never in a million years would I have imagined myself sitting in meetings and attending sessions with a team at such an amazing company, and the fact that I, a 17-year-old contributor, am able to attend such events. I would also like to thank everyone involved in organizing and planning this event. It ran so smoothly, and was very enjoyable, for me at least.

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Reflections on Mozilla’s Whistler Work Week

The rest of my summer will be like a horse race

This coming week I’m traveling to Whister, British Columbia for a Mozilla event. The week after that I’m going on a cruise to Alaska with my family. Then I’m off to drumline camp at my school, followed by the start of full marching band camp. Combined with volunteering at Mozilla and completing summer projects, my free time is dwindling fast, and inversely, my stress levels are rising. The simple solution is to do less things, which is why (after being coerced by my parents), I will be halting development on Terml.io for a little over a month, and it’s the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do.

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The rest of my summer will be like a horse race

The power of automation in web development and QA

As many of my readers know, I have a webdev project, Terml.io. Last night, I had my first big launch, besides the first release, and introduced some new features, like a redesign and Premium Accounts. Since these were major features that had the potential to bring down the site, or not work properly for our launch, I compiled a list of features that had to work before we shipped.

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The power of automation in web development and QA

“I Am Mozilla Web QA” – meet Justin Potts

Justin PottsWhat do you do at Mozilla?

I am a core contributor for the Web QA team. According to the Mozilla wiki, this means that I “have made major contributions to support the mission through their contributions of time and skill. They give Mozilla reach in terms of scope, geography and influence far beyond what could be achieved through directly staffing an organization.” I work on everything, from automation to manual testing, and this summer will be spending my time on switching our test framework from Selenium to Marionette.

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“I Am Mozilla Web QA” – meet Justin Potts