Terml.io is now open source!

It is with much pleasure that I announce the release of Terml.io today as now an open source tool that will help students not only study definitions, but now expose them to real-life industry standard code.

Open sourcing Terml.io has always been something I wanted to do, however with the payment system and premium feature integration, I opted to keep it closed to encourage use of our own platform. From this point onward, I will be taking mostly a hands-off approach. My colleague, Jeffrey Wang, will be in control of all aspects from this point onward, and I will be a contributor should I decide to make updates.

At this point in time, Terml.io is stable, with a clean design and good functionality. There is no better circumstance to step back from this project, although I hope it continues to grow from here. Thanks again, to all who supported the product since its beginning. Keep rocking.

You may view the new GitHub repository here.

Advertisements
Terml.io is now open source!

Ads suck, but the RevenueHits service has an interesting model

Ads suck. We know that. The rise of Ad Blockers and companies moving towards an ad-free platform are on the rise, and it comes as no surprise. Consumers hate ads. Even commercials are annoying — annoying enough to encourage them to record the episodes and fast forward, or pay for a service like Netflix, and this is exactly the benefit of using ads as a service provider. While people hate ads, you are able to increase premium subscriptions and get them to buy into anything to remove the ads, given the ads aren’t too annoying they drive away traffic.

Continue reading “Ads suck, but the RevenueHits service has an interesting model”

Ads suck, but the RevenueHits service has an interesting model

The rest of my summer will be like a horse race

This coming week I’m traveling to Whister, British Columbia for a Mozilla event. The week after that I’m going on a cruise to Alaska with my family. Then I’m off to drumline camp at my school, followed by the start of full marching band camp. Combined with volunteering at Mozilla and completing summer projects, my free time is dwindling fast, and inversely, my stress levels are rising. The simple solution is to do less things, which is why (after being coerced by my parents), I will be halting development on Terml.io for a little over a month, and it’s the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do.

Continue reading “The rest of my summer will be like a horse race”

The rest of my summer will be like a horse race

The power of automation in web development and QA

As many of my readers know, I have a webdev project, Terml.io. Last night, I had my first big launch, besides the first release, and introduced some new features, like a redesign and Premium Accounts. Since these were major features that had the potential to bring down the site, or not work properly for our launch, I compiled a list of features that had to work before we shipped.

Continue reading “The power of automation in web development and QA”

The power of automation in web development and QA

First Release of Terml.io

Today, Terml.io was released, which was a huge milestone for me in my development career. Never before have I programmed something so large scale where I had to keep track of what I was developing, when I was going to push it, and finally when I release it to the public. I’m especially excited for this release because I believe that this service will help thousands of students everywhere with their education, helping them create quality definitions.

Continue reading “First Release of Terml.io”

First Release of Terml.io