We should be rewarding students for experimenting with tech, not punishing them.

Just over an hour ago, a student at my school was given in-school suspension (ISS) for finding an opportunity in the code on his school-issued laptop to enable administrator privileges. Now I know this student personally. He’s a good friend, and I know his intentions behind what he was doing, and why he chooses to pursue technology. It’s his passion, and he was merely trying to allow himself more privileges to experiment with some cool technology. On one hand, it’s fun to mess around on a computer, finding some settings to play with or a cool place to test some code. Although it can have some unintended consequences, it does have its advantages.

On the other hand, the school’s position is understandable. You don’t want 3,000 kids running around with admin controls on a school issued laptop wreaking havoc on the systems and the network, but one guy who I have never seen do anything remotely close to wreak havoc should never be punished with something as severe as ISS. At least they should let him off with a warning.

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We should be rewarding students for experimenting with tech, not punishing them.

Why Twitter Should Keep the 140 Character Limit

Recently, I’ve seen a lot of articles and headlines reading things like “For Twitter to survive, they need to abolish the character limit.” Now I haven’t been in the world of tech as long as these journalists have, and I’m no expert on the metrics of networks like Facebook versus Twitter in relation to their character limits, but I firmly believe they should keep the limit, and here’s why.

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Why Twitter Should Keep the 140 Character Limit

The Struggle of Teens Everywhere

It’s that time of year where juniors in high schools across the United States start taking the SAT, the ACT, thinking about where to apply for college, and thinking about their future that lies ahead. Many of us have the notion that a bright future only comes with a degree received from somewhere like UC Berkeley, Yale, Princeton, MIT, and so on… These are many teens’ ideas of how to get a great start into a world of competition and combat a dim outlook on the job market in the US. To most teens, these Ivy League and top tier schools look like they have everything you could ever need: A beautiful campus, a sterling reputation, not to mention the conspicuous alumni database of people like Barack Obama, Mark Zuckerberg, and wealthy investors right off the famous strip called Wall St. However, being the planner I am and my need to feel like I need to make sure every detail of my life is in order, I started researching these types of glorified institutions, and what I discovered was shocking.

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The Struggle of Teens Everywhere